Ereena

Ereena Eri Silk Orange Flowers Natural Dye Block Printed Joda Shawls– AC 4559-02

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Ereena

Ereena Eri Silk Orange Flowers Natural Dye Block Printed Joda Shawls– AC 4559-02

Unavailable Rs. 24,500.00

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Our Joda shawls are made of organic eri silk and envelop you in comfort! They may be used...Read more

Our Joda shawls are made of organic eri silk and envelop you in comfort! They may be used as wonderful throws.

Our present one-of-a-kind collection in natural dye  block printing on 'eri' silks explores free flowing forms and patterns in mostly red, blue and black combinations using natural dyes and wooden blocks.

Outlines of the pattern are engraved on blocks made of teak, mango and neem. They are then soaked in linseed oil. A design may need more than one block
and the number of blocks in turn depends on the number of colors used. While one block is used to print the outline, the patterns within are filled with different blocks.


The colors for printing are made with natural dyes, which is an arduous process and requires great skill. Scrap iron and black jaggery gives black, manjistha (the root of the madder tree) and alizarin gives shades of red, and the bark of the gum tree shades of brown. Natural indigo is used to get the most beautiful shades of blue.

The raw fabric is first bleached. The washer men keep sprinkling water on the surface of the floating cloth as the hot sun beats down hard and bleaches the fabric. Next, myrobalan fruits are crushed and soaked in water for ten hours
to prepare the mixture in which the fabric is soaked. Milk is also added to prevent colors from bleeding.

The fabric is now ready for printing the outline of the design in black, red or chocolate. Gum is mixed in every color for it to fix to the fabric. Once the outline is dry, the fabric is ready for printing the other colours in the design. These printed fabrics are washed again to remove the gum that fixed the colour. Next, the printed fabric is boiled in a copper cauldron filled with water to which 'jajji' leaves are added to prevent the fabric from sticking inside the vessel,using the necessary raw material to develop the desired color. The colors the secondary prints will take depends on the mordants used when the fabric is boiled .Only an expert can tell what color will evolve. The fabric is again finally washed in the canal and dried for the last time, before it is ready for use.